Wednesday, May 18, 2016

almost

David came home from work today and I was lying in bed. I just started Cipro. I hear it's full of fluroquinolones. I don't know what they are. They makes you feel really sick. Omnicef, Azithromycin, minocycline, mepron, flagyl, diflucan, septra, coratem, and now Cipro. So I was curled up and David walked into the room and he was crying.

My husband works full time as a middle school teacher. Towards the end of this year the board of his school agreed that the staff would receive health insurance.

Next year will be his sixth year at the school and he will finally get health insurance. Spouses, too! The board said they were 90% percent sure. David filled out all the paperwork and that night I took him out to a restaurant and we celebrated.

I am happy to have insurance. Insurance doesn't cover Lyme Disease but I'm happy to have it. But it is hard to afford, nearly $1,000 a month for the two of us, and our parents help us pay for it. We could not afford it otherwise. If you're in the working class you can't pay for health insurance and pay for a disease and pay for a house and ever get ahead. 

We're looking better now, things are getting easier. 

But today the board changed its mind. It decided at the last minute that it was not plausible to provide the teachers with health insurance. David cried and held my hand as he told me.

I'm so sorry. There has been so much hope and gratitude and delight lately. I want to share it with you. I will soon. You are a bright light in a cold harbor.

But the hard stuff is getting to me tonight. Tonight I can't handle this anymore. It feels like it is killing me. Maybe it's the fluroquinolones.

I think I'll feel better in the morning. I'll try and get back on here tomorrow and think of something a little lighter to say.

If you're interested in helping, here is how, here is why, and here is how I'm going to say thank you.

15 comments:

Nicole said...

Well shit. That is ridiculous. Why would they not offer teachers, those that educate our future, health insurance. This just pissed me off. On a positive note,�� I'm sending vibes of health insurance to you and David. I believe that if you put it out into the universe, somehow, someway... It will arrive in some form. Also sending a peaceful heart to you both. This is a moment, a very tough moment for y'all. But it's a moment that will change. ��

Maria said...

I get so pissed off with US healthcare, over and over again. Apart from two summers I worked in Alaska I've never actually lived in US, but I have read - over and over again - from people that I care about, how they've struggled with this f*ckin' senseless system there, and I have got pissed off at it over and over again. And it's actually one of the VERY good reasons I wouldn't consider living in US permanently myself. It's just... so f*ckin' senseless how hardworking people and their families can go bankrupt when they get problems with their health, and often it's not even their faults! Genetics, accidents..

I am so sorry you are having to go through this. I am so sorry.

But even at this time you are a light to me. I love reading your words, and getting your insight. And one day when you and David come to New Zealand to kayak or raft or whatever, you are so going to stay at my house and I am going to shower you with fresh bedsheets and yummy food my husband has cooked and drive you and your kayaks to waterways and get your gear to dry on our porch and if we'd built a sauna by that point, soak you in a nice, hot sauna in the evenings.

You are such a delight to read! Thank you.

Lori Delgado said...

I am so, so, sorry this is happening to you. I am mad at the system for you. Just pissed. Hard working people, not getting health care provided to them ought to be a crime. I am so sorry.

Anonymous said...

This is such insanity to me. I'm just baffled. In Canada, not only would your basic healthcare (services of MDs and hospitals) be completely free, but David, as a teacher, would have the absolute best extended healthcare possible. This means that all prescriptions and some alternative therapies would also be free - for both of you - and any kids. David would also have a very livable salary, amazing job security, a fantastic pension and some parental leave benefits.
Looking in from the outside, I'm just so confused at the US. I know this is preaching to the choir, and probably not helping you in your current situation at all, but seriously, what the fuck is going on down there???

Jill said...

Shit. I wish I could loan you some of our insurance. We just got it ourselves, so I know the relief of having that net and I also understand the devastation of having it ripped away. I wish these things didn't have to happen to you. I wish we weren't so helpless. Maybe if we pretend we're not, we'll make it come true. Either way, the book you end up writing about all of this is going to be amazing and will change the world. I truly believe that.

Suzie said...

My heart sank when I read this, I'm from England so don't understand much about the US health system but I am absolutely staggered that a teacher, A TEACHER, doesn't get health insurance, how is that even possible!?!? I am so sorry this has happened to you both, I just wish I could do more to help you, instead I will send love across the miles. Hugs xx

Rhett said...

Is it ok to blurt out "That fucking sucks"? Because that's what first comes to mind. I am so sorry you are dealing with all of this. Why doesn't a teacher of 6 years (or any years) get health insurance as part of his job benefits and why doesn't insurance pay for Lyme? It's just senseless. I hope the Cipro helps you and you're not feeling horrible from it for long. I so hope tomorrow you wake up feeling much, much better and the sun is shining for you.

Maria said...

Discussing this with my husband here. I know it's far-fetched and I hope it's not offensive, but... would it make sense to move to Canada, or somewhere else where medical system is not so f*cked up? Both insurance and treatment wise. And I know that it's kind of late now that you're getting better and there's family and friends and house, but... f*ck. I'm just racking my brain here trying to think what to do. This is so f*cked up.

Keli said...

What.The.Hell. I can't believe that a teacher doesn't receive health insurance. Shame on the district, board, parents, community...everyone who allows this to happen. I'm sure with everything you've got going on that the thought of selling your home and moving is just too much to even wrap your head around at the moment but there are other districts, state, countries, wherever that would provide health insurance. Is there a way we can help Dave get certified in those states or something? Geez....I'm just rambling here, have no clue what the hell I'm talking about. I just feel for you both SO much and wish we could fix it.

Sundry/Linda said...

I am sure you are ALL FULL UP on advice from the peanut gallery, but I am forging ahead anyway: I hope you have some sort of counselor to talk to as you navigate this. You surely have so many who love you and are offering support, but one more carabiner in your emotional climbing toolbox can't help. Signed: someone who gets you, and is struggling with the morning's wallop that I don't know if I should stay home and in bed from my fractured tibia pain, or suck it up and get in the car so I can see my awesome hippie who offers conversation, visualization tools, and even the odd dousing in floral essauces and oils.

Sri said...

I hope you and Dave are angry, very angry. It really fuels change. Don't let the world dictate anything to you. Good luck as always!

Emily said...

How frustrating :-(

I echo the comment above that said you're probably sick of comments from the peanut gallery :-), so forgive me for adding one...

we have also been needing better benefits than either of our jobs offer and have been exploring options. I was surprised and delighted to discover several companies that offer benefits for part-time employees. At Starbucks, you qualify for benefits (and really good ones) if you're working 16 hours a week! Others include: McDonald's, Chase Bank, Wendy's, Costco...

Obviously, we wish that we had great benefits with the jobs we love. Also, as a deep lover of our small town and local places, it was somewhat ironic that I'm looking for work in chain coffee shops/restuarants... but worth it to us. I was able to find sixteen hours a week (two-three evenings, one weekend day or half-day), and it is worth it to us.

You may have already considered it, but if not... just an idea.

sarahldh said...

Wait... how did the district get out of providing insurance? It's my understanding that all employers with over 50 employees HAVE to provide insurance under the "Affordable" Care Act?

Anonymous said...

@Maria, Although the sentiment is great, I'm afraid that moving to another country for better healthcare isn't really an option. I realize this is a whole other conversation, but it's an interesting one, as here in Canada, we're seeing tons of press about all of the American's who are packing their bags for Canada in case Trump gets in, and we're kinda staring back at them in bewilderment. As much as we'd be happy to rescue some hard-working, liberal minded, folks from the political mess that is the US, it's just not that simple... people can't just come here and use the healthcare system simply because they want to. You have to be a Canadian citizen (or well on your way to becoming one) to qualify for medical care here - indeed, even to live/work here for any extended period of time. That takes years of in-depth applications... I've watched people go through it and it is pretty intense. Unless Melina had dual citizenship (one Canadian parent), it's not really a viable option. My wish, truly, is to see real change happen in the US.

Melina said...

@sarahldh Dave works at a private middle school in town with less than 50 employees. It's a wonderful school but this is a major downside.